902 Smithsonian Online Exhibit

OMG YOU GUYS THIS IS TEH AWESOME. “EveryBody: An Artifact History of Disability in America.” Click around it and you’ll see many exciting and informative things and people.

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3 thoughts on “902 Smithsonian Online Exhibit

  1. I did not know that left handed people are considered disabled. While most things are made for right handed people, I never really thought that left handed people were at such a disadvantage that would make them consider themselves disabled. But as I think about it, I do notice the discrimination. 10% of the human population is left handed, but I notice that, even at such a cosmopolitan school like Temple, very little chair desks/or whatever their called are suited for left handed people. I think that the subtle discrimination is just as harmful as the blatant discrimination that the more publicized disabled face.

    • No, it’s really not the equivalent of being denied access, work, health, or life. But back when it was ruthlessly corrected in schools and elsewhere — when you had to write with your right hand — there was a certain amount of stress, stigma, and shaming going on.

  2. When searching through this website, I went to the “people” section, and I thought about, for the first time, the breadth of disability. Disabilities affect everyone: men and women, young and old, rich and poor, as well as any ethnicity. This fact, to me, really shows how ridiculous it is that disability rights even needs to be an issue. Literally anyone can be affected by a disability at any time; with this great a range of people with disabilities, at least accessibility should not be an issue anymore. Prejudices, too, seem strange, since there are so many disabilities and people with them; this, however, is an issue that deals more with psychological factors which likely contributes to its prevalence. Additionally to the range of disabilities and who they affect is the fact that they have been around for so long, which too adds to my puzzlement on the continuing existence of prejudice towards disabled people.

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